#SWPACA18 CFP Highlight: Science Fiction and Fantasy

2018-Science-Fiction-and-FantasyScience Fiction and Fantasy is full of great topics. Find the one that relates to you below, then review the expanded information for submitting your work. Find more subject areas on our call for papers page as well!

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sci-fi

Science Fiction and Fantasy

Apocalypse, Dystopia, and Disaster in Culture
Shane Trayers, PhD, Middle Georgia State College – Macon Campus, English, trayers.shane@gmail.com

Open Description

The Apocalypse, Dystopia, and Disaster in Culture Area is calling for papers about anything apocalyptic, dystopic, or disaster-related.  This can be in movies, television, literature, graphic novels, or any other cultural examples of disaster, dystopia, or the end of the world.

This year did not disappoint in these topics, including Stranger Things, Handmaid’s Tale, The Expanse, Dark Tower, Guardians of the Galaxy, Into the Badlands, Westworld and many, many more. This area is interested in all types of theories, both real world and fictional.

Please note that this area is specifically for those papers related to the apocalypse, dystopia, and/or disaster.  For example, there is now a separate Zombie Culture area at the conference, so if the proposal is about the “zombie apocalypse” it goes here, but if it is just about zombies, then it goes to that area. See the Zombie Culture CFP at http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

Ideas for topics on Apocalypse, Dystopia, and Disaster (not a comprehensive list):

  • Film and TV: Westworld, The Expanse, Handmaid’s Tale, Dark Tower, Stranger Things, Star Trek Discovery, Into the Badlands, OA, The Man in the High Tower, Resident Evil, GhostbustersThe 5th Wave, ZooRiddick, Twelve MonkeysThe Scorch TrialsJurassic WorldMad Max, Killjoys, Dark Matter, Between, Chappie, The Leftovers, Sharknado, The Last Ship, Edge of Tomorrow, The Giver, Godzilla, Resurrection, Snowpiercer, The 100, Mad Max, Divergent, Defiance, Elysium, Oblivion, Sharknado, This is the End, After Earth, Adventure Time, Melancholia, Falling Skies, The Walking Dead, Resident Evil, Terminator, 2012, The Core, Daybreakers, Zombieland, Night of the Comet, Armageddon, The War of the Worlds, Last Night, 12 Monkeys, The Road, Dark Angel, Jericho, Children of Men, The Matrix, Crimson Tide, Invasion, V, Contagion, Dante’s Peak, The Island, The Day the Earth Stood Still and many more.
  • Literature: Life as We Knew ItWhen She WokeReady Player OneFind MeThe 5th Wave , Feed Uglies, J, Station ElevenBrave New World, The Bees, Rot and Ruin, Matched, Infinite Jest, Oryx and Crake, Breathe, World War Z, Pesthouse, The Road, Children of Men, Alas Babylon, The Stand
  • Graphic novels and video games: Y: The Last Man, Left 4 Dead, Resident Evil, The Walking Dead
  • Real examples: “Prepper” communities and publications, natural disasters, Paris and Orlando shootings, Atomic culture.

Or any other works/topics related to apocalypse, dystopia, or disaster!

Submit Proposal

Dr. Who, Torchwood, and Whoverse Studies

Melissa Tackett-Gibson, PhD, Sam Houston State University, Sociology, mat012@shsu.edu

Open Description

Proposals for individual papers and panels are now being accepted for the Dr. Who, Torchwood and Whoverse Studies area of the Southwest Popular/American Culture Association 2018 Conference. Proposals of 200-250 words are accepted through the conference website: http://conference.southwestpca.org. The inclusion of a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

Presentations from cultural studies, film, sociology, mass communication and critical perspectives are welcome. All must relate to television shows in the Dr. Who universe, published fiction (including fan fiction), and other forms of Who-related narratives and discourse. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Gender and sexuality
  • Powered relationships, (in)justice and discrimination
  • Human nature, mortality, eschatology and spirituality
  • Violence and aggression
  • Fandom and fan culture (including online discussions, fan fiction, and fan websites)
  • Material culture, merchandising and consumption
  • Narrative structure
  • Narrative shifts over time
  • Casting, direction and production techniques

Submit Proposal

Harry Potter Studies
Christopher Bell, PhD, University of Colorado – Colorado Springs, Communication, cbell3@uccs.edu

Open Description


SWPACA invites scholars to submit papers to the vibrant and diverse Harry Potter Studies area. The Harry Potter Studies area is an interdisciplinary/cross-disciplinary field that focuses on both the novel and filmic versions of J.K. Rowling’s work. Papers may address the work as a whole, specific characters, themes, relationships, social and/or cultural implications, individual texts within the series, etc.

Paper and/or panel proposals are welcomed. Any and all types of scholars, including independent scholars, graduate students, non-tenured, tenure-track, tenured and emeritus faculty are encouraged to submit. The Harry Potter Studies area aims to emphasize a diversity of scholarship opportunities and is open to innovation in approach to research about the Potterverse. Networking among Potter scholars with an eye toward post-conference collaboration and publication is a key goal of the Harry Potter Studies Area.

Papers from the Harry Potter Studies area presented at conferences since 2012 have been gathered into four (4) published, edited volumes released in 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016. We are an area committed to publication!

Submit Proposal

Science Fiction and Fantasy – General
Susan Fanetti, PhD, California State University – Sacramento, English, sfanetti@csus.edu
Follow the Science Fiction and Fantasy area on Facebook at www.facebook.com/swtxsff and on Twitter @swtxsffchairs

Open Description


The Science Fiction and Fantasy (General) Area Chair invites paper or panel proposals on any aspect of science fiction in literature, film, or other media. Any and all topics will be considered. Past presentations have covered a variety of topics – including British SFF TV, fan studies, race, gender, sexuality, socio-economic class, pedagogy, adaptation, and a variety of texts. We are interested in thematically or textually linked panels of three or four papers as well as individual submissions.

Please look through the list of other conference areas on the SWPACA website, since subjects such as apocalyptic studies, computer games, the works of Joss Whedon, and the television show Supernatural all have separate areas. You should direct your proposal accordingly.

Submit Proposal

Supernatural (TV series)
Erin Giannini, PhD, Independent Scholar, egiannini37@gmail.com

Open Description


The Area Chair invites proposals related to the CW television series Supernatural.

Any and all topics will be considered, although we especially encourage proposals on:

  • Narrative structure
  • Genre conventions
  • Fandom/Fan culture
  • Representations of socioeconomic class, gender & sexuality, and race & ethnicity
  • Representations of myth, religion, and (urban) legend
  • Uses of violence
  • Music in the show
  • The series’ response to/engagement with metatextuality and/or fandom

Submit Proposal

The Works of Joss Whedon
Susan Fanetti, PhD, California State University – Sacramento, English, sfanetti@csus.edu

Open Description


The Area Chair invites paper or panel proposals on any topic related to the works of Joss Whedon. Any and all topics will be considered.  Insights into Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, and Firefly are always welcome, but Whedon’s body of work continues to expand, and we encourage proposals on:

  • Whedon’s work in the Marvel ‘verse, including Astonishing X-Men, The Avengers, and Avengers: Age of Ultron
  • The Whedonverse comics, from Fray on
  • Much Ado about Nothing
  • The Cabin in the Woods
  • Dollhouse

Submit Proposal

Zombie Culture

Brandon Kempner, PhD, New Mexico Highlands University, English, bkempner@nmhu.edu

Open Description

The area chair for Zombie Culture seeks papers and presentations on any aspect of the zombie in popular culture and history. It seems as though the world has gone “zombie crazy.” There are zombie walks, games on college campuses like “Humans Vs. Zombies,” zombie children’s books, zombie poetry, fiction, video games, zombie ammunition and guns, and zombie running contests. Almost anything can be “zombified” and society and fans all over the world are literally “eating it up.” The zombie has come to represent the chaotic world we live in, and courses continue to pop up on college and university campuses all over the world. This is due in large part to the success of films like Night of the Living Dead, Zombi 2, Dawn of the Dead, 28 Days Later, Shaun of the Dead, Warm Bodies, World War Z and television programs like The Walking Dead, iZombie, Z Nation, and Fear the Walking Dead.

What is distinctively American (if anything) about zombies in film, literature, and popular culture in general? How does the zombie influence American culture in a way that resonates in our transmedia world?

Some topics to consider:

  • Directors: George Romero, Lucio Fulci, Umberto Lenzi, Todd Sheets, Danny Boyle, Sam Rami, Peter Jackson, Amando de Ossorio…
  • Specific zombie films: White Zombie, King of the Zombies, Dawn of the Dead, Tombs of the Blind Dead, Dead Alive, Evil Dead, World War Z, Train to Busan
  • Specific books/zombie literature: The Zombie Survival Guide, Zone One, The Girl with all the Gifts, the Newsflesh trilogy, The Reapers are the Angels, Cell
  • Zombie writers’ fiction and non-fiction: Stephen Graham Jones, H.P. Lovecraft, Robert Kirkman, Steve Niles, Max Brooks, Matt Mogk, Jovanka Vuckovic, Stephen King…
  • Zombie television: The Walking Dead, Fear the Walking Dead, Z Nation, iZombie, The Santa Clarita Diet
  • Zombie video games: Resident Evil, Call of Duty: Zombies, The Last of Us, Day Z, Dead Rising
  • Zombie comics (any aspect: history, cultural impact, storytelling, Marvel zombies…)
  • Zombies since 9/11
  • Zombie children’s books
  • Zombie runs and zombie cosplay
  • Fast vs. slow zombies
  • Zombie gore
  • Teaching the zombie (zombie pedagogy)
  • Can a real zombie outbreak happen?
  • The voodoo zombie and the historical roots of the zombie
  • The Euro-zombie, Nazi–zombies, Viking zombies
  • What exactly is a zombie?
  • Humans vs. zombies
  • Zombies across the world (Ro-langs…)
  • Zombies’ roots in cinema
  • Are mummies/Frankenstein’s monster zombies?
  • What does the rise in the zombie’s popularity tell us about society?

These are just a few of the topics that could be discussed.

Submit Proposal

See more subject areas on our call for papers page!